Category Archives: DIY Tutorial

How to Hang a Hook on a Hollow Door

wood-hook-brown

I know it’s only been a few months since I “finished” my mini bathroom makeover, but I am still SO in love with this tiny space. Like I said throughout the makeover process here on the blog, our only bathroom was always fine but never felt like my style. And because I didn’t have a budget or most importantly, the need to gut the whole thing (it was too nice for that) I thought my bathroom would be forever fine.

bathroom-round-mirrorBathroom Updates

But after some new paint, new lights, DIY shiplap, and a touch of decor/art that was far more me, I now love our bathroom. Fast forward a few months and this feeling has not gone away (yay!), but I have noticed a tiny upgrade that I want to make in order to allow this tiny space to work even harder for us.

bathroom-before-pics

The Problem

There are currently hooks in our linen closet (the left door) that Matt and I use to hang our towels, but drying towels inside of the closed closet is not always effective (hello damp, mildew-y towels). We used to have towels hanging out in the open, which solved that problem previously but we ditched those hooks with the makeover and are now in need of a solution. Hanging damp towels in the linen closet at night to find  that they are still damp the next day is never a good idea. Ew.

The Solutiontowel-hook

I brainstormed a few options, but ultimately decided to add a hook onto the back of our door (I was inspired after using this dreamy hook in Casey’s guest room last time I slept over there actually). I figured if I added a cute hook, it would not only add a bit more of my style but most importantly, it would allow me to hang my towel overnight.

Hmmm….

But allow me to back track a bit because I’m getting a little ahead of myself here. When I decided I wanted to add a cute hook to the back of the door, I had two challenges:

1. Picking out a hook

2. Learning how to hang this hook on a hollow door without impacting the other side of the door

So let’s chat….

Deciding on a hook

I initially planned to hang the exact same hook as Casey’s because I love it so much. But when I went to order it online, I quickly realized that I have ZERO hints of gold in my tiny bathroom so this hook may not work as well as I had imagined. I decided that I want to use this hook sometime in the future, but this bathroom project was probably not the right time.

That’s when I started searching for a hook that would work well with this design. Here’s what I found (along with the pros & cons of each):bathroom-hook-options-46-pm

1 // 2 // 3 // 4 // 5 // 6

  1. Hemisphere Hook: I have been pretty obsessed with this hook since Casey added it to her guest room, but because my bathroom doesn’t have ANY gold in it, I just don’t think it works. Maybe in my next bathroom because I love this look and totally think it goes with the ‘feel’ of this space. 
  2. Leather Hook: This is a bit outside of my normal look but I really liked the hint of leather on this hook. But because the leather seemed a bit “orange-y” online, I decided this was not the perfect option for this space. Plus this one only came in gold.
  3. Brass + Pearl Round Hook: Loved the detail on this hook but because it didn’t come in silver/chrome, I didn’t think it was a perfect fit for my bathroom.
  4. Simple Knob Hook: Loveeeee the simplicity of this hook but I wasn’t sure how well it would hold a heavy towel. Plus, I wanted to add a bit more personality with the hook and this one seemed a little too much of a “safe choice”.
  5. Black + White Hook: I’ve ALWAYS been obsessed with this hook and I really wish I could have made it work, but I was afraid that it may stick out too much and hit the wall/door behind it. Plus, I think the stripes is a bit too preppy for this space but someday I definitely hope to incorporate this cutie.
  6. Modern Wood – I ended going with this one because I loved the modern, simple design. PLUS, the wood went really well with the vanity, it didn’t stick out too far, and came with screw colors of your choice (I requested silver). I’m not sure if I would use this exact hook in a grouping of hooks, but for this specific purpose, I REALLY love it.

bathroom-hook-etsyhook-nail-anchor-diy

Hanging the Hook

Once I finally found the hook I wanted, I had to hang it… on a hollow door… for the first time ever! Here are the steps I took (along with some rookie tips that will hopefully save you from drilling all the way THROUGH the door!) #notgood

Double Check

The first thing you need to do is find anchors that are short enough that they will not go all the way through the door. My hook came with anchors + screws, so I held both of these items up to the door just to make sure that they were short enough to fit inside the door.

Using a tape measure, I measured the center of the door and held the hook up to that spot. Then I colored in the markings to identify where I would drill the pilot holes for the anchors. I double checked my work with a tape measure and a level a few times JUST to make sure.

drill-anchor

Drill Pilot Holes

Rookie Tip: Add painter’s tape on the pilot bit so you know how far you can drill into the door without poking out the other side. I put the anchor (which I knew was a safe length) next to the drill bit and taped exactly where that stopped. I knew that the painter’s tape was the absolute FURTHEST that the drill could go into the door.

anchor-door-progress

Starting to drill is the scariest part…. not to freak you out or anything. I only say that because it’s important that you proceed with major caution drilling your pilot holes because if you put too much muscle behind the drill, you could find yourself poking a hole all the way through the door. This would be AWFUL because it would mean you need to buy a whole new door. Luckily pairing some serious caution with the painter’s tape trick, I drilled both pilot holes without drilling all the way through the door.

Rookie Tip: Drill slowly! The door is hollow, which causes a problem when you drill through the door surface. Once you get to the hollow part, your drill tends to fall forward so it’s important you don’t have a lot of muscle/momentum behind it. Drilling very slowly will ensure that even after you hit the hollow part, you drill won’t take off and keep on moving!

anchors-in-hollow-door

Add Anchors and Screw In

Once the anchors are secured, it’s pretty easy from here on out! I held up the hook and slowly tightened the screws into the anchors.

Just like that, my hook was secure and I was digging the new look!

bathroom-hook-frameswood-hook-brownopen-door-hookhook-towel-bathroombathroom-door-towelbathroom-hook-frames-mirror

And since it’s been up, no more damp towels in the morning! Plus, the hook is so darn cute that when I remove the towels and just look at the plan hook…. I still love it! This mini project took me about 15 minutes and I could not be more excited. Quick projects that make such a difference in our daily routine are seriously my favorite and totally motivate me to continue to make these minor changes throughout our house.

Motivation!

Anyone else recently tackle a 15 minute project that made such a big impact on your daily routine?! Bridget Signature

P.S. To catch up on the entire bathroom makeover, check out this post!

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4 thoughts on “How to Hang a Hook on a Hollow Door

  1. DIY Playbook

    Great Question Megan! To be perfectly honest …. this hook only solves the problem for one of our towels so we either share a towel (I shower at night, he showers in the morning — is that way too weird/TMI?!) OR he hangs his on the door knob of the linen closet and when it’s dry, we add it to the hooks inside the closet.

    The system is not perfect, but it works a lot better than what we used to be doing. =/ #babysteps haha

    Reply
    1. Nicole B.

      This conversation is too funny! We have the opposite problem in our master bathroom. The previous owners put up way too many hooks in the bathroom… as in an obnoxious amount! There are so many that even after hanging shower towels, hand towels, and one decorative towel… there are still empty hooks up! Hahaha. First world problems though

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4 thoughts on “How to Hang a Hook on a Hollow Door

  1. DIY Playbook

    Great Question Megan! To be perfectly honest …. this hook only solves the problem for one of our towels so we either share a towel (I shower at night, he showers in the morning — is that way too weird/TMI?!) OR he hangs his on the door knob of the linen closet and when it’s dry, we add it to the hooks inside the closet.

    The system is not perfect, but it works a lot better than what we used to be doing. =/ #babysteps haha

    Reply

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Getting Organized Under the Kitchen Sink

organized-undersink-kitchen

I consider myself to be an organized person. I’m not a fan of clutter, I’m pretty darn good at purging, and a messy room makes me squirm. But I’m not SUPER ORGANIZED. You know…like the everything-labeled-perfectly-aligned-color-coded organized people out there? I’m certainly not in that category.

While some closets, cabinets, and areas of our home are pretty tidy there’s one cabinet that has been on my to-do list since we moved in…disorganized-undersink

…underneath the kitchen sink. You can see my failed attempt at keeping it organized. I have some baskets in there and a big bucket for rags. But it really was not working for us and was far from functional. disorganized-cleaning-suppliesI’d take one spray bottle out to do some cleaning, and then fight to try to squeeze it back into this basket. undersink-mess-kitchen

I don’t always love keeping wet sponges out and about, so I’d often throw them under here and then frantically search for a clean sponge the next time I did dishes. This entire cabinet was just not functional and every time I opened it I was mad at myself for not making it a priority.

kitchen-sink-gif

So I finally decided to do something about it. Now let me forewarn you that you’re not going to see a cleaning cabinet color-coded to perfection. And you’re certainly not going to see things labeled or cleaning products put into pretty bottles or canisters. Yes, I like things pretty..but I also like to be a realistic with my organizing projects. So here are 3 EASY changes I made to make this cabinet work for our kitchen.

  1. Tension Rod for Spray Bottlesspray-bottles-on-tension-rod

I picked up a tension rod from Lowe’s and installed it in the front of the cabinet. The one I got wasn’t very heavy-duty, so I have it resting on the hardware from the kitchen cabinet doors. That way it can easily hold heavy bottles without sliding.

Here’s a link to a similar one on Amazon. tension-rod-undersink

They did have some tension rods that you can screw into the wood sides, and that would be great to hold a lot of bottles. Because I wanted to test out this new method before creating any holes in the cabinets, I decided to go with the less intense one. But the heavy-duty one is a great option too!spray-bottles-rod-kitchen

Ours holds the cleaners we use just about everyday or so, and it’s so easy to simple reach in and grab them!

2. Sponge Holdersink-sponge

I also found a little clear sponge holder and I attached it to the inside of the wood cabinet using command strips. It holds our wet sponge, scrub brush, and the sink stopper.

Here’s a link to a similar one on Amazon.

organized-undersink-supplies-cleaningHonestly, it’s been a game changer for me! I don’t have to keep the wet sponge out, yet it’s still easy to locate!

3. Pull-out Double-Decker Drawers

how-to-organize-undersink

Another great addition under here is this little double-decker pull-out organizer I found. I’m able to put gloves, extra sponges, and mop pads on the bottom.

Here’s a link to a similar one on Amazon. organized-undersink-drawers

Then on the top I have more cleaning supplies (seriously…why do we have so many?!), that we regularly use like our dish soap and pledge. organized-cleaning-supplies

In the back, I added another little compartment (I think it’s an old dish soap packet container) to hold items we rarely use. supplies-organized-basket

I can just simply move the big bucket o’ rags, and grab these items when I need them…which isn’t all that often. Speaking of those rags…rags-bucket

…they’re still hanging out in the bucket. Yes I could have folded them all nicely and gotten a cute little basket for those. But in reality, it would have become a big mess all over again. I don’t have time to fold our rags. That’s just life right? So instead they’re all in our big bucket…which honestly doesn’t bother me at all.

output_gWGPAS

All in all I think it’s a great improvement, as we were able to maximize all of the space in here and really make it functional for everyday use. organized-sink-kitchen-cleaning-supplies

And it’s crazy how one little organized cabinet can bring you so much joy! Maybe not so much that I actually look forward to cleaning, but at least I get a little smile on my face every time I open this cabinet. casey_sig

P.S. Thanks for the support on The DIY Playbook Style Series! We are so happy that you guys are excited for this new series, and we cannot wait to get started next Wednesday. As always…you guys are the best! 

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12 thoughts on “Getting Organized Under the Kitchen Sink

  1. Austin Schneider

    This is fantastic! I’m one of those “really want everything to be perfectly organized, but it only stays that way until I actually need to use something” type people. (eye roll) This is the best of both worlds – neat but also functional.

    Reply
  2. Trang

    I’m pretty OCD about organization under the kitchen sink as well. I also installed a wire 2 tier pull out drawer for under my sink. It holds so much and keeps things super organized.

    Reply
  3. Katie

    Oh good idea with using the old container for supplies! I’m almost outta those packet things and will have an empty bin.

    Reply
  4. Diana @ Bumps Along the Way

    That is EXACTLY how I think of myself as being organized. I purge regularly, keep clutter under control but every closet and cupboard is not super pretty even though it’s clean (ish)!. I decided life is too short to fold rags too. I just throw them all in a bucket from the dollar store and it works just as well!

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12 thoughts on “Getting Organized Under the Kitchen Sink

  1. Austin Schneider

    This is fantastic! I’m one of those “really want everything to be perfectly organized, but it only stays that way until I actually need to use something” type people. (eye roll) This is the best of both worlds – neat but also functional.

    Reply
  2. Trang

    I’m pretty OCD about organization under the kitchen sink as well. I also installed a wire 2 tier pull out drawer for under my sink. It holds so much and keeps things super organized.

    Reply
  3. Katie

    Oh good idea with using the old container for supplies! I’m almost outta those packet things and will have an empty bin.

    Reply
  4. Diana @ Bumps Along the Way

    That is EXACTLY how I think of myself as being organized. I purge regularly, keep clutter under control but every closet and cupboard is not super pretty even though it’s clean (ish)!. I decided life is too short to fold rags too. I just throw them all in a bucket from the dollar store and it works just as well!

    Reply

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A Trick for Hanging Hooks…Without Measuring

laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-3

I shared our board and batten drop zone earlier this week and I cannot thank you guys enough for the love! You guys are seriously the sweetest, how did Casey and I get so lucky?!!

My favorite part of this space is the black hooks. Like I mentioned Monday, I got the two big black hooks from Casey. They were left over from her entryway project and when she offered to give them to me, I was SO excited because I love hers so much. <— Perks of having a bestie that loves DIY as much as you! 

Of course I could have gone the traditional route of hanging the new hooks by measuring with a tape measure, but when I hung my bedroom hooks, my dad taught me an easy, no-measure way of hanging these hooks.

His way was GENIUS to me and saved us lots of time and measuring headaches. My hope is that you can use this rookie trick to save you a few headaches next time you’re hanging hooks on your board & batten.

laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks

The No Measure Trick

He used painter’s tape as a “template”. The painter’s tape did the measuring so we didn’t have to. All you have to do is place the painter’s tape flush with the bottom of the horizontal board (assuming that board is level).
laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-2Then place the base of the hook right up to the bottom of that tape, making sure it’s in aligned with the vertical board below. laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-4Use a pencil to lightly color in where you will have to drill the pilot holes. laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-5Then attach the hooks using those pencil marks as guides. Because the tape did the measuring for you, your hooks should be the exact same height aka level with one another <— all without using a tape measure!! laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-7I chose to place the tape beneath the hooks, but you can place the tape above the hooks and use the same method for a different look. Or depending on the width of your board, you can also use a skinny or even fatter piece of tape.

Regardless of what you decide, tape = NO tape measure! laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-9

For the bottom hooks, I unfortunately didn’t have any skinny tape to use so I had to use the good old-fashioned measure method, which took me about 3 times as long to tackle. But in my defense, these hooks weren’t being hung at the intersection of the vertical boards, so a tape measure was probably necessary.

Although this simple trick may not work for EVERY situation, hopefully it’s one you can add to your “tool” bag of tricks for the future.  Bridget Signature

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Laundry Room Drop Zone

laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-10

Last week I was SO proud to share how I changed my first light switch and that project was all thanks to your words of encouragement over the past few months! I still owe you guys for giving me the friendly “nudge” I needed to give my first electrical project a try.

changing_electrical_light_switch-10
I was so focused on the rookie tips I learned along the way that I never mentioned what space was in need of a white switch + switch plate.   Laundry-Room-beforeSpoiler Alert: I’ve been working on this baby wall in my Laundry Room and that’s where I installed the new light switch. Right before I went back to school for the year, I added board and batten to this tiny space. Believe it or not, this is one hardworking wall in our home so I wanted it to look more like the drop zone we already use it as.

Now that I’ve done my fair share of board and batten projects (maybe too many depending who you ask), I was able to do this ENTIRE wall, including paint, in one day (minus hanging the hooks).

I started around 8am and worked until it was painted with its second coat of white paint, which took me to about dinner time! Literally a days work brought me from that….

laundry-room-board-and-batten-with-hooks…. to this!

Supplies

The night before I started working, I picked up the supplies from Lowe’s.

  • 2 pieces of thin lattice, long enough to be cut down to four strips (vertical strips)
  • 1 MDF 1×3, long enough to be cut down (horizontal strips)
  • 3 of these hooks
  • White Light Switches
  • White Switch Cover

I had all of the other tools/supplies for this project, which kept the cost of this project way down. Casey gave me her leftover white paint, extra caulk, AND the 2 gorgeous black hooks on the very top of the wall. All together this entire project cost me less than $40!

Tutorial

Because we have tackled board and batten so much on the blog, I skipped the step-by-step shots this time around. But if you are looking for a board and batten tutorial, check out this post, this post or even this post! <— wow can you tell we absolutely l-o-v-e this easy DIY?!

laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-7No Measure Hooks!

The black hooks are probably my favorite part of this new look (thanks Casey!!). I love how bold they are next to the white…. so classic! And would you believe me if I told you that I hung these hooks without using a tape measure? I have a little trick on how to hang hooks evenly and level, without measuring, coming to the blog on Thursday. #LIFECHANGING
laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-12

Tiny Space, Big Job

Even before this mini makeover, we used this tiny space A LOT. Since we have a small house, incorporating vertical “storage” space is important to keep the house de-cluttered and organized.

I strive to make sure everything (literally everything) in our house has a “home” and this space is usually home to our school bags right when we come home from work.
laundry_room_board_and_batten_hooks-11It’s close enough to the kitchen for us to grab something quickly if we need to, but it’s tucked away behind the laundry room wall so we never see the clutter. And although it seems weird to put hooks so close to the doorway, hanging stuff here somehow works for us. We have another door that leads outside to our patio so we don’t use this “side door” very often at all, which allows us to hang stuff on this wall without being hassled.

Heart Eyes Now & Later

I am glad that we lived here a few years and established these routines before diving into this project, because putting hooks or a mini drop zone so close to a door may not work for everyone.

This project was SO WORTH the $40 and a summer days work! This laundry room nook has always worked hard for us, but now it works hard AND looks good, which makes me really happy with how this project turned out.

laundry-room-board-and-batten-with-hooksAnd note to self: if I ever have a formal mudroom in my next home, I know for sure that board and batten plus black hooks will definitely be a part of it. I’m officially in love with this classic combo. Bridget Signature

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15 thoughts on “Laundry Room Drop Zone

  1. Liz Gordon

    Looks great! I have a similar set-up near my front door; I’m totally bookmarking this idea for down the road!

    Reply
  2. Erin

    imagine how hard it’s gonna work come winter time. but yeah i stick by the whole “live in your space for a bit” before you make any drastic changes. our front closet has two levels of hooks, the bottom is all about the dog stuff and the top is like scarves, bags, etc.

    Reply
  3. Kenley

    Just now finding this for my industrial wood shelf project! This is the best explanation of this project I’ve found. One question: when Lowe’s cut down your pipes, did they also have to thread each pipe they cut, where they cut it? I noticed you have threading on both ends of each cut-down pipe…

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Thanks Kenley! And yes when Lowe’s cut down the pipes, they added a thread on the side that was cut (which made the pipe threaded on both sides).

      Hope this helps!! =)

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15 thoughts on “Laundry Room Drop Zone

  1. Liz Gordon

    Looks great! I have a similar set-up near my front door; I’m totally bookmarking this idea for down the road!

    Reply
  2. Erin

    imagine how hard it’s gonna work come winter time. but yeah i stick by the whole “live in your space for a bit” before you make any drastic changes. our front closet has two levels of hooks, the bottom is all about the dog stuff and the top is like scarves, bags, etc.

    Reply
  3. Kenley

    Just now finding this for my industrial wood shelf project! This is the best explanation of this project I’ve found. One question: when Lowe’s cut down your pipes, did they also have to thread each pipe they cut, where they cut it? I noticed you have threading on both ends of each cut-down pipe…

    Reply

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6 Rookie Tips for Changing a Light Switch

changing_electrical_light_switch-10

I changed a light switch… ALL BY MYSELF! And to be perfectly honest, I need to THANK you guys, our readers, for encouraging me to give this project a try. <— you guys are the best.

When I shared the fact that I hired an electrician to change the outlet, light switch, and vanity light in our bathroom makeover, many of you weighed in and encouraged me to ditch the electrician and tackle these electrical projects myself. You guys INSISTED that changing an outlet/light switch is not nearly as scary I always thought it was.

changing_electrical_light_switch-2This encouragement (paired with Casey also insisting I could DIY this project) left me with no choice but to give it a try. #fiiiiiiinnnneeeeeee

I recently tackled another board and batten project in our home (details on the blog Monday!) and was left with an almond light switch that needed to be swapped out with a new white one. Even though I was still a little hesitant, I had to give it a try… at least once, right?
changing_electrical_light_switch

Supplies

  • White Light Switch
  • Screw Driver
  • Drill <— some of the nails were super tight, so I needed a drill for extra power
  • Black Electrical Tape

changing_electrical_light_switch-4

What I learned

I decided to write this post from a perspective of “what I learned/Rookie Tips” and NOT “how to change a light switch”. Because this is an electrical project (and electrical can be dangerous if not executed properly), I don’t feel comfortable giving others a step-by-step tutorial… not yet at least.
changing_electrical_light_switch-7So instead I’m giving you the tips I learned a long the way in hopes that my rookie mistakes will save you from making the same ones. changing_electrical_light_switch-8

1. Research

RESEARCH, RESEARCH, RESEARCH before you start! I watched a few videos on YouTube and read a few blog posts about tips & tricks. I wanted to have as much information about this project as possible before starting it.

changing_electrical_light_switch-11

2. TURN OFF all electrical

Before you even touch the outlet, you HAVE to turn off the electrical. To be extra safe, I turned off the electrical in the entire house (which posed a problem when I wanted to use the internet tutorials to refer back to… oops). But having the electrical off is ESSENTIAL for rookies like me.

Experienced electricians can swap out the outlet when the electrical is still on, but I would never recommend that to rookies. Making sure all of the wires were “dead” prior to getting started made me feel much safer and ready to tackle this project with a bit more confidence. changing_electrical_light_switch-103. Take a picture

I would highly recommend taking a picture of the old outlet’s connections before removing it. Having a cell phone picture of the wire connections helped me double-check where I was putting each wire, even after I removed the old switch. I would highly recommend this trick because it’s so darn easy and it can make such a difference.  changing_electrical_light_switch-13

4. Have supplies nearby

Get your supplies ready and nearby before you start. Because the electrical was off (read: no air, no refrigerator, no internet), I wanted to get this project done rather quickly. I definitely wasn’t in a rush, but having ALL of my supplies nearby helped me get this project done in less than 15 minutes.  changing_electrical_light_switch-12changing_electrical_light_switch-14

5. Be careful when removing the old switch/outlet

The walls in this room were never primed  by the previous owner, so the paint in this space is very sensitive and can easily be peeled back when the wall is in any type of distress. Because I painted over the edges of the original light switch for this project, when I went to remove the outlet some of the new paint peeled back (see it on the right side?). When I realized what was happening, I removed the old switch A LOT more carefully. But some of the damage was already done! Maybe this won’t happen in your home, but it’s definitely something to note when removing your old switch. Peel it back carefully just to be safe!
changing_electrical_light_switch-16

6. Don’t over-tighten the cover plate

I didn’t over-tighten this specific switch plate cover, but it has happened to me in the past. Once I tightened a switch plate so much that it cracked! Luckily switch plates are like $2, but running back to the hardware store AGAIN is never fun. changing_electrical_light_switch-15You guys were right, changing a light switch is NOT as scary as I always thought it was. I’m so glad you encouraged me to give it a try because I would have never tried a project like this without your encouragement and words of wisdom. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!
changing_electrical_light_switchMy next goal is to try to change a light fixture (eek!). You guys mentioned that this project is also pretty easy and based on your track record so far, I’m already convinced I can do it!

PS. Reveal of this mini board & batten space on the blog Monday! <— I know, I know you’re probably thinking… “enough board and batten!!” and to be honest, I don’t blame you but I just c.a.n.’.t s.t.o.p.! 
Bridget Signature

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6 thoughts on “6 Rookie Tips for Changing a Light Switch

  1. Alysha

    Great tips! I’ve done this with my husband before but he definitely didn’t explain as well. Especially the picture idea that’s a great tip!!

    Reply
  2. Trang

    Way to step outside of you comfort zone Bridget. And look at you now….an expert in this task. Yay! So proud of you girl. You don’t know something until you try it and learn. Life is great that way, constant learning (I’m sure you tell your student this right?).

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Thanks to your encouragement, Trang!! I would have never tackled this project without you cheering me on so thank YOU! And you’re right, lifelong learning is key to growing and trying new things. We say that in the classroom all the time, I definitely have to practice what I preach.

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6 thoughts on “6 Rookie Tips for Changing a Light Switch

  1. Alysha

    Great tips! I’ve done this with my husband before but he definitely didn’t explain as well. Especially the picture idea that’s a great tip!!

    Reply
  2. Trang

    Way to step outside of you comfort zone Bridget. And look at you now….an expert in this task. Yay! So proud of you girl. You don’t know something until you try it and learn. Life is great that way, constant learning (I’m sure you tell your student this right?).

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DIY Modern Address Plate

diy_address_sign-2

When I replaced the “builder grade” mirror in our bathroom and saw what a difference that simple update made, I instantly felt more motivated to look for other small changes around our house. That’s when our current address sign caught my attention and jumped to the top of my DIY to-do list.
diy_address_sign-25Much like the mirror, our existing address sign isn’t necessarily ugly. It just wasn’t my style. After a little browsing on Pinterest, I was at the hardware store the next morning shopping for supplies to make our current address plate a little bit more “me”.

Because of dry time, this project took me two days but only about 2 hours of total work to complete. After spending a few hours in the garage jamming out to Pandora, check out what this sign looks like now…

diy_modern_address_sign-3I’m in l-o-v-e and just like the mirror, I can’t believe it’s taken me over 3 years to make this simple upgrade!! Here’s a step-by-step tutorial of how I DIY-ed a new address sign that’s A LOT more me.

Supplies

  • Piece of Wood cut to size (mine is a 2 ft piece of pine, but any size would work)
  • 20-30 Paint Sticks (I actually bought two packs of 15 sticks for 98 cents a pack — I felt bad asking for that many FREE sticks at the paint counter)
  • Nail Gun/Nails
  • Miter Saw
  • Stain (dark walnut)
  • Water Seal Spray
  • 5″ Floating Address Numbers (I used these ones)
  • Clear Silicon
  • Power Drill
  • Picture hangers

diy_address_sign-11Step One: Remove Old Sign

I removed the old address sign with my drill and if you look carefully, you’ll see that two anchors were still left in the concrete after I took down the sign. I hate drilling into concrete (as evidenced by this post!), so I did everything in my power to make sure the new sign could be hung using those existing anchors. To do that, I made sure to save the screws from this sign and drill them in the exact same spot on the next sign.

diy_address_sign-12Side note: I feel bad just throwing away this perfectly fine sign, but I don’t have any use/ideas for it. Any ideas?! Has anyone upcycled theirs in a fun way?!

diy_address_sign-16Step Two: Lay out paint sticks

At this point I set up my miter saw and started laying out the paint sticks and cutting them to size. I wanted the paint sticks to be laid randomly on the block of wood so that none of the seams lined up. Honestly I didn’t use any particular method, instead I just eyeballed it and cut the paint sticks to fit the length of this board.
diy_address_sign-17

You want to decide pretty early on if you want your paint sticks to be placed super tightly next to each other, or if you would rather have a bit of space at each seam. I ended up choosing a bit of space in between the seams and each row of paint sticks because I liked the way it looked.

I also liked that the rows of paint sticks would fit perfectly on the board if I used that method. However, I wouldn’t necessarily recommend keeping space in between either the seams or the rows because it made drilling into these areas a tad difficult later on in the process. Not impossible, just difficult.
diy_address_sign-19

Rookie Tip:

Once I had the layout all set, I got out my nail gun and started nailing these paint sticks into place. I would HIGHLY recommend NOT doing it this way. I should have stained the board and all of the sticks before I did any cutting/nailing. Having the board + sticks prepped prior to cutting would have made the staining process A LOT easier. <— you wouldn’t have to use 25 Q-tips to try to stain in between the seams. #oopsdiy_address_sign-22

Step Three: Nail in place

I used the nail gun to carefully nail each paint stick in place… trying to keep the board’s original “layout” in place as much as possible so I knew where to nail each piece.
diy_address_sign-21

Step Four: Stain & Seal

I stained the board and sticks using Minwax’s dark walnut stain color. I wanted the sign to be dark brown but not SUPER dark brown (like Jacobean, which I typically love). I wiped the stain on the sticks (and in between the seams with a q-tip) and then wiped off the excess. This process did the trick, but like I said, I would recommend completing all staining before cutting and nailing.

diy_address_sign-28

I allowed the sign to dry overnight (with a fan). Then I used this waterseal spray to water proof the sign. Honestly, this address sign is located under our home’s soffit so it doesn’t experience a whole lot of water exposure, BUT I thought sealing it couldn’t hurt for the few times it may get wet. (note: the color of the wood changed after I sprayed the waterproof seal but once it dried, the color was back to normal).

I did two coats of this spray and let it dry overnight before attaching the numbers (see directions on the bottle for more specific instructions).

Step Five: Attaching the Numbers
diy_address_sign-14

I bought these address numbers because they were modern looking and had the option to lay flat or appear “floating” on the address sign. I opted for the floating look and although I’m really happy with the look of my new sign, I wasn’t a huge fan of working with these numbers.
diy_address_signI read the box, read a few tutorials online, and even searched YouTube for some clarification of how to install these numbers because the directions on the box left me a bit lost. If you’re looking to recreate this look, allow me to explain this process in more detail, so hopefully you don’t find yourself as confused as I was.

The first thing you need to do if you’re looking to install these FLOATING numbers (different directions if you want them to lay flat) is screw in the small part of these screws into the back of each letter (see above photo). diy_address_sign-2

The box came with a template that you could cut out and place on your surface but the tutorials I read all noted that these templates were a “smidge” off. I tested that theory and they were right; the template didn’t line up perfectly. =(
diy_address_sign-7Instead, I placed the number on the wood plate, eyeballed it, and lightly marked where to drill. diy_address_sign-3

Then I used these pencil marks to identify exactly where I should drill the pilot holes. diy_address_sign-4See the three pilot holes for the 8?

diy_address_sign-5Once you have confirmed that the number will indeed fit into these holes, you fill each hole with a generous amount of clear silicone, which will act as glue, and place the number back into these holes to dry.

diy_address_sign-6A few rookie tips:

  • Be as precise as possible when marking where to drill the holes
  • Use a drill bit that is the perfect size so your hole isn’t too small or too large (size details on the package)
  • Be generous filling each hole with clear silicone
  • Eventually you will have to go back to add a little stain touch-up around these holes, which was super easy with a Q-tip.

Step Six: Hanging Equipment

Once the stain “touch-ups” were done and the numbers were dry, I added two picture hangers to the back of this sign. This is another step that should have probably been done before the number installation but ya live and ya learn, right?! (obviously there was lots of learning happening in this project!!)

diy_address_sign-10I made sure to install these picture hangers at the exact location of the existing anchors in the wall. This way all I had to do was drill the original screws back into the anchors and hang this puppy up. And that’s exactly what I did…

diy_modern_address_sign-4This project costs me about $30 (most of the budget was spent on the metal numbers) and I think the investment was WELL, WELL worth it. PLUS, this project has me even more motivated to tackle mini projects that make a big impact on our space.diy_modern_address_sign

diy_modern_address_sign-2I’m already eyeing my space to see what other builder basic item I can replace. Hmmmm… any suggestions?! Anyone else replacing builder basic with items that are so you? I’d love to hear about it!diy_modern_address_sign-3

diy_modern_address_plate

Bridget Signature

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25 thoughts on “DIY Modern Address Plate

  1. Kara D

    Looks amazing! I wanted to redo my house number, but it’s just a single number, so putting it on a wood backing or something felt a little silly?

    Mailbox! You can definitely add that on to your list as a builder-basic item to upscale. My house’s mailbox came with this old country-style magnetic cover on it, and as my first project – I spray painted on a series of two toned purple chevron stripes. It makes me smile every day I come home! You can also paint the post, add numbers, reflectors, etc to it. And if yours isn’t a post-style, but a “box on the house” style (I’m sure there’s a more official name for it…), you can still do it up with paint and handles and whatnot. Another small item that has a good impact on curb-appeal!

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      A single number sounds awesome… lucky you, Kara!

      And love, love, love the idea of adding a little love to the mailbox. Our mailbox actually lives across the street on our neighbor’s property (weird, right?!) so I always feel a little weird giving it the attention it deserves. I would love to add color & character to it, maybe this is the push I needed!

    2. DIY Playbook

      OMG — that magnetic is GENIUS!! I have never seen anything like that and I’m literally ob-sessed! Thank you so much for sharing that, Kara. I honestly can’t get over how clever that is!

  2. Nadine Peacock

    Just don’t make your numbers too hard to read. First responders need to see what address they are going to if called. When I replaced my numbers I made them huge and right above the garage so they were really easily seen. So many people have told me how easy it is to find my address on my house because of the size and placement of my numbers.

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Wow, great point Nadine! Thanks so much for sharing that super important info. I would have never really thought of that but it’s so important to consider, thank YOU!!

    2. Teran

      In my parents’ neighborhood, everyone has their address number sprayed on the curb in front of their driveway. The HOA did everyone’s at once to make it easy for first responders. It’s super helpful, but it doesn’t detract from curb appeal either.

  3. Gretchen Braun

    I never would have guessed that this was a DIY project, let alone with paint sticks! I love how modern this looks. Right now, my house doesn’t even have numbers on the outside (just on our mailbox in the yard!) so I think I need to add something 🙂

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Yes, this project is calling your name! And the best thing is that you can totally personalize it to fit your home’s style. Color, numbers, layout…. the possibilities are endless!

  4. Trang

    I’ve been wanting to tackle this project for my home too and the one I want to attempt is this one pictured below ever since I saw this couple’s garage home (now my dream home) in Portland, OR. Wow! They used left over screws from their home renovation. Great way to upcycle!

    Reply
  5. Austin Schneider

    Obsessed with this! Also, I LOVE that you include what NOT to do, ha ha – learning from other’s mistakes is so much better than making them yourself! Such good things to consider, too – I’m sure I would’ve done the exact same things, especially with the hangers on the back *face palm*.

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Thanks Austin! Of course, I’m happy to share my mistakes! Part of the learning process, right?! And hopefully my mistakes will save others from making the same ones. =)

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25 thoughts on “DIY Modern Address Plate

  1. Kara D

    Looks amazing! I wanted to redo my house number, but it’s just a single number, so putting it on a wood backing or something felt a little silly?

    Mailbox! You can definitely add that on to your list as a builder-basic item to upscale. My house’s mailbox came with this old country-style magnetic cover on it, and as my first project – I spray painted on a series of two toned purple chevron stripes. It makes me smile every day I come home! You can also paint the post, add numbers, reflectors, etc to it. And if yours isn’t a post-style, but a “box on the house” style (I’m sure there’s a more official name for it…), you can still do it up with paint and handles and whatnot. Another small item that has a good impact on curb-appeal!

    Reply
  2. Nadine Peacock

    Just don’t make your numbers too hard to read. First responders need to see what address they are going to if called. When I replaced my numbers I made them huge and right above the garage so they were really easily seen. So many people have told me how easy it is to find my address on my house because of the size and placement of my numbers.

    Reply
  3. Gretchen Braun

    I never would have guessed that this was a DIY project, let alone with paint sticks! I love how modern this looks. Right now, my house doesn’t even have numbers on the outside (just on our mailbox in the yard!) so I think I need to add something 🙂

    Reply
  4. Trang

    I’ve been wanting to tackle this project for my home too and the one I want to attempt is this one pictured below ever since I saw this couple’s garage home (now my dream home) in Portland, OR. Wow! They used left over screws from their home renovation. Great way to upcycle!

    Reply
  5. Austin Schneider

    Obsessed with this! Also, I LOVE that you include what NOT to do, ha ha – learning from other’s mistakes is so much better than making them yourself! Such good things to consider, too – I’m sure I would’ve done the exact same things, especially with the hangers on the back *face palm*.

    Reply

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How to Seal a Marble Dining Room Table

marble-table-tuff-duck-sponge

As you guys know, we finally have a dining room table. It only took us about 10 months of living in our home to take the plunge and choose one. Can you tell we like to weigh all of our options first?! Ha!

dining-roomBut lo and behold, we finally chose a dining room table and I could not be happier with our purchase! Our marble table is seriously stunning, and these photos do not do it justice. During the entire first week of it being in our home, I’m pretty sure I “pet” it everyday while walking by. Yep, weird. But that’s how much I love this baby!

marble-tableBecause my love for this table runs deep, you can bet your bottom dollar that I am going to do everything in my power to keep it looking great for years to come. And because it’s marble…that means that sealing it right away was my top priority!

Why seal marble?

marble-tableEarlier this year we chatted about the importance of sealing your granite countertops. It’s just as (if not more!) important to seal any marble, or else you’re leaving the porous stone exposed and open to staining and markings. Even something as simple as putting a glass of iced water on an unsealed piece of marble can leave a water ring. No bueno. So it’s really important to properly seal marble and continue to keep up on that seal every couple of years.

marble-table-tuff-duck-spongeBefore the table even arrived, I had already researched dozens of products to find the best one to seal our porous marble. After reading lots of tutorials and reviews, I went with Tuff Duck (which I found on Amazon, because online shopping is the only way I know how these days! #prime)

Suppliesmarble-table-sealer-tuff-duck

  • Stone Sealer (I used the brand Tuff Duck)
  • Kitchen Sponges
  • Rags
  • Beach Towels (to keep your surrounding surfaces clean from over-spray)

Steps

1. First, I wiped off the table with a dry rag and made sure it was squeaky clean.

marble-table-beach-towel2. I shook up the bottle of Tuff Duck and put beach towels on the ground where I was going to spray, so it wouldn’t over-spray onto the ground. Then I started spraying generously in a small 2ft x 2ft area.

marble-table-seal-sponge3. Per the directions, I made sure to keep the area very wet and evenly coated. To get it even, I used a kitchen sponge and patted the sealer all around that small area. The sponge really helped ensure that I didn’t miss any areas, and it kept any areas from being too heavy, and others too light.

marble-table-seal-wet4. I continued doing this until the entire table was covered with sealer. I had to keep moving my angle to make sure it wasn’t drying. If an area looked dry, I simply sprayed and patted that spot again.

marble-table-wet-sealed5. The instructions inform you to keep the area fully wet for 15 minutes. So again, if it looks like it’s drying…spray some more sealer on there!

marble-table-sealer-sponge-rag6. Once it’s been 15 minutes, I wiped the excess sealer off with an absorbent rag. You’ll want to make sure you get all of the sealer off of the table.

7. Because I’m suuuuper nervous about our table getting stained, I decided to repeat this process twice to make sure it was completely protected! That second coat went on 30 minutes after the first. The bottle says full protections happens after 24 hours, so we avoided using it until then (which was pretty easy since we didn’t even have chairs at this point…)

marble-dining-room-tableAnd seriously…that’s it! Not very hard, right?! Seems totally worth it to take some time upfront, instead of being stuck with a stain or watermark FOREVER!

I’m not gonna lie though, even though the table is sealed I still find myself always using a coaster. Plus when we eat we use placemats. Am I being overly crazy? Any other marble owners out there want to ensure me that it is totally safe? No one ever likes to be a crazy coaster lady.

But can you blame me? It’s just sooooo pretty.seal_a_marble_table casey_sig

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2 thoughts on “How to Seal a Marble Dining Room Table

  1. Trang

    Ha! I can so relate to this Casey. I ‘pet’ my new granite counter tops too (it was just installed Friday). Can’t resist. Luckily the installers told me that it was already sealed for 5 years so I’m good for now.
    I do have a newer marble coffee table I purchased that I have yet to seal so this is a wonderful post to have. Thank you!

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Congrats on the new countertops, Trang! Lucky girl! I bet they’re gorgeous.

      And so exciting about the coffee table. If we didn’t get a marble dining one, I was definitely going to go with marble for a new coffee table. Good luck sealing…seriously so easy!

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2 thoughts on “How to Seal a Marble Dining Room Table

  1. Trang

    Ha! I can so relate to this Casey. I ‘pet’ my new granite counter tops too (it was just installed Friday). Can’t resist. Luckily the installers told me that it was already sealed for 5 years so I’m good for now.
    I do have a newer marble coffee table I purchased that I have yet to seal so this is a wonderful post to have. Thank you!

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More Bathroom Updates: A New Shower Head

waterpik_shower_faucet_bathroom-5

[Disclaimer: This post is sponsored by Waterpik. All opinions and photography are our own and are not influenced by Waterpik. Thank you for supporting the brands that support The DIY Playbook]

I didn’t plan on touching any of the plumbing when I first started this mini bathroom makeover… heck, I didn’t really plan on any of these recent updates until I hung our dreamy new mirror. But when Waterpik reached out and invited us to review their new Torrent PowerSpray+ shower head, I thought, “what’s one more project on the to-do list at this point?!” and eagerly agreed.

waterpik_shower_faucet_bathroom
The plan

waterpik_shower_faucet_bathroom-2My old shower head wasn’t necessarily bad, it just didn’t have any spray options. I was excited to install this new shower head because it has 9 different spray options, which I was hoping would make rinsing the shampoo & conditioner out of my super thick hair a lot easier… meaning quicker showers! waterpik_shower_faucet_bathroom_toolsI have never installed a shower head before. I videotaped the process for the video in this post, and was pleasantly surprised to find out that the entire install only took me 2 minutes and 50 seconds! All I needed for the project was channel lock pliers (I bought a pair for $10) and plumber’s tape. This Waterpik shower head cost $35 so this entire project, including new supplies, costs me less than $50!

Video Testimonial


P.S. Did anyone else notice during the installation time-lapse when I drop the plumber’s tape?! Ha! The roll went everywhere…

waterpik_shower_faucet_bathroom-5More Ratings

Overall, I’m happy with the new shower head, but here’s even more honest feedback to consider. On a scale from 1-5 stars, here’s how I would rate the Waterpik Torrent PowerSpray+ in each of these categories:

  • Innovation – 5 stars *****

    • I love that this shower head saves 1/2 a gallon of water per minute, has 9 spray options, was super easy to install.
  • Performance – 4 stars ****
    • Better than my last shower head, love the different spray options, loses one star for massage power… not as strong as I anticipated but still better than my last.
  • Massaging Power – 3 stars ***
    • I think the stream of water on the “massage” setting is perfect for getting my shampoo and conditioner out faster, but I don’t know if I would use that setting as a powerful massage all over my body (TMI?). I actually don’t mind that though, because I like the idea of saving water over having an uber powerful massage. That’s just me though…
  • Style + Design – 5 stars *****
    • Sleek, stylish, love the hint of black.

* Waterpik shower heads available at Target, Wal-mart & Home Depot.waterpik_shower_faucet_bathroom-4

 To summarize

Would I recommend you changing your shower head if you’re not happy with your current one? YES! It takes a couple of minutes and I promise if I could do it, so can you!

Would I recommend you getting a shower head with different spray options? YES! I’m obsessed with the spray options!

Would I recommend the Waterpik Torrent PowerSpray+? Yes! For the affordable price point, I think this shower head has a lot to offer and is a great addition to our upgraded bathroom makeover.
Bridget Signature

P.S. More bathroom updates (as in my vanity lights & new paint) next Thursday on the blog.  =)


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8 thoughts on “More Bathroom Updates: A New Shower Head

  1. Kara D

    Hehe, I did notice you dropped that plumbers tape! I swear it’s part of the normal process, that’s why they give you so much on that roll for one little showerhead! I’ve changed out showerheads a couple of times and I drop that stupid roll every.single.time!

    Another reason to change out showerheads is to try to “simulate” better water pressure. My master en-suite bathroom had poor water pressure, and there wasn’t anything I could do about it. In a desperate move, I got one of those aerating showerheads (also from #target! I think it was Waterpik too!) and it’s made such a world of a difference.

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8 thoughts on “More Bathroom Updates: A New Shower Head

  1. Kara D

    Hehe, I did notice you dropped that plumbers tape! I swear it’s part of the normal process, that’s why they give you so much on that roll for one little showerhead! I’ve changed out showerheads a couple of times and I drop that stupid roll every.single.time!

    Another reason to change out showerheads is to try to “simulate” better water pressure. My master en-suite bathroom had poor water pressure, and there wasn’t anything I could do about it. In a desperate move, I got one of those aerating showerheads (also from #target! I think it was Waterpik too!) and it’s made such a world of a difference.

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Shiplap for Rookies

diy_white_shiplap_tutorial-6

Breaking News: My shiplap dreams have come true! I recently talked about how this new round mirror had me completely itching to make a few more updates in our bathroom. (Enter my shiplap dreams).

In a perfect world, I would shiplap the entire bathroom, but there were a few roadblocks and a few uncertainties that urged me to shiplap halfway up the wall instead. #babysteps

I used painter’s tape to visualize the “look” and thought some shiplap was better than none, so I proceeded with the project and haven’t looked back since. Before I get into the tutorial, I want to add a few disclaimers:

  1. I did this entire shiplap project for around $70. Casey let me borrow leftover white paint and I had all of the tools, so all I had to pay for was the wood. And to be honest, I could have done it for less if I figured out preciously how much wood I needed before I started. #oops
  2. I did all of the shiplap while Matt was out-of-town and Casey was at work, proving that if I can do it ALONE, I know you can do it too!
  3. I did recruit my mom to help on Day 2 because I needed an extra set of hands to hold the shiplap while I nailed it in the wall. <– Moms are the best, aren’t they?!  Always willing to help.
  4. I would definitely do this project again on a larger scale and think shiplapping a whole bedroom would be even easier than a bathroom because there are less detailed cuts and less tiny spaces to work (i.e. behind the toilet)

Now, onto the rookie level DIY shiplap tutorial…

SuppliesLowe's Material for ShiplapLowe's Material for Shiplap

  • 2 pieces of Plywood cut down (aka “ripped”) to 5 1/2 wide strips
  • Corner wood accent piece to hide seams
  • Finishing piece of wood to add to the top seam of the shiplap (I forgot what I used, but it’s a 2″ square piece that I had cut to size in the lumber department)
  • Wood Glue + Caulk Gun
  • Caulk
  • Nail Gun
  • Primer
  • White Paint
  • Roller + Paint Brush
  • 50 cents in Nickels (to act as spacers)

Step 1: Get plywood cut down (free at Lowe’s!)

Shiplap can be a very cost-effective project because plywood is so darn reasonable! I used maple plywood and had two sheets cut down (in store… for free!) to 5 1/2″ strips. You can get your strips cut down (they called it ripped) to whatever size you want. I bought two sheets and had quite a bit leftover. For $24 per board, this stuff is a steal!

Rookie Tip: The plywood I bought is very light and flimsy and did do a bit of chipping when I cut it down, so if you want wood that’s a bit more sturdy, consider buying plywood that’s thicker.

Material for ShiplapStep 2: Cut the shiplap to size and label

You don’t HAVE to do this step next, but I didn’t want to paint ALL of my wood since I knew that a lot of it wouldn’t be used. To identify exactly what wood needed to be painted, I pre-cut the plywood to fit every area in the bathroom.

The day I tackled this project, Matt was out-of-town and Casey was at work, so I had no choice but to do it all by myself. I would hold the piece of wood approximately where it would end up going on the wall, then I marked the wood and headed to the garage to cut it down with a miter saw.

Shiplap step by step tutorialMy BIGGEST piece of advice is to mark on the back of each piece of wood where it will eventually be hung. This piece was marked “2R”, which meant “R” for right of the vanity and 2 for second from the top. I marked every piece of wood so after I painted all of the pieces, I knew exactly where they should be hung on Day 2.

Step 3: Prime the walls and the boards

After the pieces of wood were cut and labeled, I primed the walls and the boards. I’m not sure if priming the wall behind the shiplap is totally necessary, but it will save you from having to get a tiny paint brush into the little cracks after it’s hung. The same goes for the sides of the boards. Priming the front and sides of each piece before it was hung really saved me tedious painting work later in the project.

paint shiplap before hanging

Rookie Tip: When priming, don’t try to cover all of the wood with ONE coat… just a light layer of primer on the front and sides of the boards is perfect. I used a roller on both the wall and the boards to avoid brush strokes.

Nickels for shiplap spacersStep 4: Hang the shiplap!

Since I already had all of the boards cut to size AND primed, all I had to do on day two was hang, caulk, and putty. The hanging of the boards took no time at all since they were all cut and ready to go.

Nickels for shiplap spacers on wallMy mom graciously volunteered her afternoon to come over and help hang the boards because I needed an extra pair of hands to hold the boards (thanks mom!!). On this wall, we started by hanging the first board along the baseboard.

We secured the boards to the wall by squeezing liquid nails onto the back of the board and then nailed the it to the wall at every stud.

Once the first board was up, we simply placed the nickels along the top of that board to create a consistent seam, and then nailed on the next board (above the first). We used that same method all the way up the wall.

Keeping the nickels in the seam as we nailed the next board was a lot easier than I thought it would be. Once the board was secure, we pulled those nickels out and used them on the next board.
Shiplap Tutorial from start to finishOnce the boards were up, we used the same method to secure the top piece of finishing wood, which created a small “ledge” of sorts. Obviously this piece isn’t needed if you’re shiplapping all the way to the ceiling.  DIY Bathroom Shiplap Tutorial from start to finish

Step 5: More hanging

Now the other side of the bathroom was a bit of a different strategy, but unless I told someone about this tiny difference, you’d probably NEVER notice it. Because I didn’t want any obvious “cuts” around the vanity, we started hanging the wood pieces on the top of the wall and worked our way down.

Starting from the top and working our way down created a tiny piece of wood that we had to fill at the very bottom of the wall (which didn’t happen on the other wall). I didn’t mind the slight difference because that tiny piece of wood is behind the toilet and is barely noticeable.
DIY Bathroom Shiplap Tutorial from start to finishSee how the top of the vanity has a whole piece above it and not a lot of random cuts? I think the tiny inconsistency between the two walls is worth the clean, consistent look around the vanity. final shiplap steps before paintEven though the bottom piece was extra tiny, we used the same method to add it to the wall — nickel spacers, liquid nails, + nail gun. We didn’t anticipate this tiny space and that’s why the wood isn’t primed like the rest of the boards.
diy shiplapbefore paintThis part is totally optional based on your preference, but I added a small finishing piece in the corner to hide the corner seams. I felt like this simple piece made the corner look more “finished” and dare I say… professional?! Ha!
diy_shiplap_bathroom_tutorial-30

Step 6: Caulk, Putty, Sand and Paint!

The next day, I caulked the top of the ledges and around the vanity. I puttied all of the nail holes and sanded down the wood. Since it’s plywood, I recommend giving ALL of it a good sanding before painting. This simple step made the wood a lot smoother and overall more consistent.
DIY white Shiplap Tutorial in BathroomLast but NOT least, I painted the shiplap using Casey’s leftover “Ultra White” (Valspar) paint from her recent board and batten project.
easy DIY white Shiplap Tutorial in BathroomI wasn’t careful about painting the top ledge of the shiplap because I’m obviously repainting the rest of the bathroom (once the bathroom fixture and outlets are changed).
DIY white Shiplap Tutorial in Bathroom and paint samples

I can’t believe how clean and BRIGHT this space looked once the shiplap had two coats of this white paint on it. I LOVE the changes and the top of the wall isn’t even painted yet.

Speaking of the top of the wall, I’m having such a hard time choosing the paint color. The dark vanity and yellowish/beige countertop (boo!) is making this color selection so dang hard.

diy_white_shiplap_tutorial-4Here are the options I have so far. Any preferences?! A lot of you weighed in on Instagram and your amazing suggestions have really helped me investigate lots of color options (thank you so much!!). Bottom line: finding the perfect “greige” is HARD!

Updates since Shiplap!

This bathroom is DONE and I can’t wait to show you the paint I chose, our new light fixture and the final reveal of this bathroom!! Here’s a sneak peek….

shiplap_bathroom_reveal-15Shiplap Tutorials for Rookies

Bridget Signature

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22 thoughts on “Shiplap for Rookies

  1. Gretchen Braun

    This looks so amazing, and way to do it by yourself! You’re inspiring me to take on big projects by myself…once you break it down it really doesn’t seem that bad! For paint colors, I like the top and bottom colors. Can’t wait to see how the final project will turn out!

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      You’re so sweet, Gretchen! And I’m glad you think it looks attainable because it really was A LOT easier than I thought it would be. I did need an extra set of hands to hold the wood while I nailed it to the wall, but other than that, the project was one I didn’t mind doing by myself. And seeing how it looks now makes me motivated to shiplap EVERYTHING! haha jk…. kinda.

  2. H Buchanan

    Your project looks great! As for the paint, I like the 2nd from the top and the bottom one. I think I like the 2nd from the top a little more though!

    Reply
  3. Heather

    Looks awesome!!! I just put shiplap in my dining room this weekend and it is crazy how EASY it is!! The only headache (for me) was actually getting the wood ripped. I wanted 6″ and the store I went to said they can no longer rip that low….annoying! Since they didnt offer an alternative for sale, I had to convince them to rip the wood down.

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Your “honorable mention” made my day!! You’re so sweet, Elise!! Thank you and quite honestly, I can’t believe I did it by myself either! #babysteps

  4. Samantha Clark

    I would probably recommend at least priming the back of the boards since they’re installed in a bathroom with a shower. I imagine the moisture could become trapped behind and cause swelling and/or mold.

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      OMG thank you for this tip!! Unfortunately I think it’s a bit late for my project, but thank you so much for sharing that tip for others tuning in (and for my future shiplap projects). Thank you, thank you, thank YOU!!

  5. Jaclyn Lorimer

    I think I’m liking the top two paint options with a beigey countertop–especially the 2nd one down. I love the cooler grays below but they might make the counter look more yellowish.

    The shiplap looks great–kudos!! You’re such a pro. 🙂
    XO, Jaclyn

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      You’re far too kind, Jaclyn! I don’t know if I would say “pro” but I’ll take it! haha It was fun and definitely a learning experience! And thanks so much for the paint tips, I am TOTALLY nervous about the counter looking yellow and will do ANYTHING to avoid that. And I agree with you, I love the bottom colors but think that may highlight the counter a bit too much. #TORN

  6. Trang

    Great solo job Bridget!
    It is extremely hard to find the perfect ‘greige’. I recently went through this when Sherwin Williams was having their 40% off paint sale. Good luck!

    I’m surprised you are hiring an electrician to change out the outlet/receptacles to white. It’s an easy DIY (just make sure the power is turned completely off). I think this calls for a blog entry on your other sites: Zillow and hireahelper. 🙂

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Aww, thanks Trang!! It’s funny because Casey told me the same thing about changing the outlet, but working with electrical freaks me out a bit. I just started another project where the outlet needs to be changed to white so I think you both have convinced me to DIY it. Stay tuned….. =)

  7. Diana @ Bumps Along the Way

    I love love love that you did this (mostly) on your own!! So impressed AND inspired to do more tool stuff on my own! (Although, as I type this my husband is using his jig to put together a headboard for me….soooo….). It looks great!

    Reply
  8. Sarah Hubbell

    Looks so good!! Curious what you used to make cuts around the plumbing stuff behind the toilet?

    Reply
    1. DIY Playbook

      Thanks lady! There was only one small pipe behind the toilet to work around. For that, I used a jig saw and cut a circle (the best I could) out of one of the pieces. It’s definitely not perfect but it’s hidden behind the toilet so I’m not too worried about it. Plus the caulking/painting helped hide any imperfection pretty well. #rookieprobs

  9. DIY Playbook

    We used a jigsaw and cut a half circle into two different boards. The seam was right there so by putting the two half circles together, it created a round hole around the pipe. Does that make sense?

    Reply

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22 thoughts on “Shiplap for Rookies

  1. Gretchen Braun

    This looks so amazing, and way to do it by yourself! You’re inspiring me to take on big projects by myself…once you break it down it really doesn’t seem that bad! For paint colors, I like the top and bottom colors. Can’t wait to see how the final project will turn out!

    Reply
  2. H Buchanan

    Your project looks great! As for the paint, I like the 2nd from the top and the bottom one. I think I like the 2nd from the top a little more though!

    Reply
  3. Heather

    Looks awesome!!! I just put shiplap in my dining room this weekend and it is crazy how EASY it is!! The only headache (for me) was actually getting the wood ripped. I wanted 6″ and the store I went to said they can no longer rip that low….annoying! Since they didnt offer an alternative for sale, I had to convince them to rip the wood down.

    Reply
  4. Samantha Clark

    I would probably recommend at least priming the back of the boards since they’re installed in a bathroom with a shower. I imagine the moisture could become trapped behind and cause swelling and/or mold.

    Reply
  5. Jaclyn Lorimer

    I think I’m liking the top two paint options with a beigey countertop–especially the 2nd one down. I love the cooler grays below but they might make the counter look more yellowish.

    The shiplap looks great–kudos!! You’re such a pro. 🙂
    XO, Jaclyn

    Reply
  6. Trang

    Great solo job Bridget!
    It is extremely hard to find the perfect ‘greige’. I recently went through this when Sherwin Williams was having their 40% off paint sale. Good luck!

    I’m surprised you are hiring an electrician to change out the outlet/receptacles to white. It’s an easy DIY (just make sure the power is turned completely off). I think this calls for a blog entry on your other sites: Zillow and hireahelper. 🙂

    Reply
  7. Diana @ Bumps Along the Way

    I love love love that you did this (mostly) on your own!! So impressed AND inspired to do more tool stuff on my own! (Although, as I type this my husband is using his jig to put together a headboard for me….soooo….). It looks great!

    Reply
  8. Sarah Hubbell

    Looks so good!! Curious what you used to make cuts around the plumbing stuff behind the toilet?

    Reply
  9. DIY Playbook

    We used a jigsaw and cut a half circle into two different boards. The seam was right there so by putting the two half circles together, it created a round hole around the pipe. Does that make sense?

    Reply

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Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

10 Things I Learned After Hanging Temporary Wallpaper

temp_wallpaper_zillow-25

This temporary wallpaper tutorial is a LONG TIME COMING. A few of you have reached out asking for a wallpaper tutorial and how we liked our experience using temporary wallpaper for the first time. Like we promised when we first shared photos of it, we are finally sharing both a tutorial and the 10 tips we learned from our first experience using this popular product.Tips_for_hanging_temporary_Wallpaper

10 Temporary Wallpaper Tips

temp_wallpaper_nursery_progress-71.  Recruit a partner: We’re pretty confident that wallpapering is a TWO person job… at least for rookies like us. We found that it was super helpful to have one person stand on the top of the ladder and hold the paper at the very top of the wall (without sticking it on the wall just yet). The other one could line up the bottom of the wallpaper with our “guide line” to ensure that when it was time to stick the wallpaper on the wall, the sheet was as straight as possible (which led to less un-sticking and re-trying). Your partner doesn’t have to be a DIY expert… just someone who will be willing to give serious attention to detail in lining up the wallpaper.temp_wallpaper_nursery_progress-5

2.  Consider the wallpaper’s design: The wallpaper we chose (this one) was actually a blessing in disguise because its busy wood pattern was pretty forgiving! Our design allowed us to make a few mistakes that the normal person would NEVER see (read that: oops, how did that air bubble get there and why isn’t it going away?!) Thank goodness the wallpaper we hung camouflages these few imperfections very well (happy accident). Also, if you’re a rookie when it comes to wallpaper, choosing an intricate design may be hard to match up from sheet to sheet so keep these things in mind when choosing your design. <— not that you can’t do it (we know you can!), we just want to bring this to your attention as something you should consider before purchasing!temp_wallpaper_nursery_progress-4

3. Buy more wallpaper than your exact measurements: When you finalize the area of the space you plan on wallpapering, you want to purchase wallpaper to cover more than that EXACT measurement of your wall. There’s going to be waste on each sheet (at the top and the bottom of the wall) so it’s important that you don’t just buy wallpaper to ONLY cover the area of your wall and no more. That would be bad… and would probably cause some serious cursing half way through the project. And that’s just never the way we want a DIY project to go…. ever, ever, ever.temp_wallpaper_zillow-20

4. The temporary paper was far more forgiving than we anticipated: We were very pleasantly surprised when we realized that the tempaper was easy to work with. We’ve worked with contact paper when lining some of our drawers and anticipated that the temporary wallpaper would work much like that product. We were wrong… and thank goodness we were! Although we were very cautious when lining up and hanging the wallpaper, we stuck almost every sheet of wallpaper on the wall and had to carefully peel it back and re-stick it slightly differently. The GREAT news was that the product allowed us to make these changes — and to be perfectly honest, thank GOODNESS because there would be absolutely NO way we could have hung this without that wiggle room. #nochancetemp_wallpaper_zillow-21

5. Consider the wall’s details & plan accordingly: Truth be told, we chose to hang this wallpaper on this wall in the nursery because it had the least amount of details/cuts. The wall was totally plain outside of the one outlet we had to cut out. The other three walls in the room each had an obstacle that freaked us out a bit (a window, a closet, and a door) so we ultimately chose this wall because of the lack of detail. Obviously you don’t have to do that same thing, but looking at the wall’s/room’s obstacles BEFORE starting will help you make a gameplan and hopefully eliminate any potential issues.

6.  Measure TWICE, cut once: We already mentioned buying a little more wallpaper than you need for the little bit of waste paper you’ll cut off the end of every sheet, but you probably won’t have enough wallpaper to make some big time cutting mistakes. SO… it’s very important to measure twice (maybe three times in our case) so that when it is time to cut, you won’t be making any costly mistakes.

7. Shine a BRIGHT light on your space the entire time: We mentioned this tip in our DIY temporary wallpaper tutorial, but we wanted to include it on this list as well. Shining a SUPER bright light on the wall throughout the whole process of hanging the wallpaper will help you spot and take care of any problematic air bubbles before moving on (and before it’s too late). Something about the bright light will allow you to spot these imperfections more quickly and more importantly, help you get rid of them!temp_wallpaper_zillow-13

8. Don’t dull the blade of your razor blade: Did you know that a disposable razor blade can be dull after one or two cuts?! We had no idea! Using a sharp razor blade to make clean, straight cuts in the wallpaper is absolutely essential to get the crisp finish. Make sure you use a new, fresh razor blade for almost every big cut.

temp_wallpaper_zillow-109. Create a large, flat workspace: We found that setting up a large flat surface was helpful for us to layout the sheets of wallpaper to measure and cut. This may not be a reality for everyone (in that case an open space on the floor works too) but if you can create a temporary table for measuring and cutting these sheets, we highly recommend that. If you are working on the floor, be VERY careful cutting each piece of wallpaper with the sharp razor blade, you do NOT want the blade to go through and cut through your floor!!

nursery_gallery_wall_minted_frames_wallpaper10. Read a few tutorials before you tackle this project: We watched this fun, little video and read about tempaper installation on the company’s website. Here’s a TUTORIAL we just wrote and shared on Zillow’s blog, we tried to include LOTS of rookie tips along the way. Hopefully our mistakes will save you from making the same ones.

Whether you choose to read our tutorial or someone else’s, we highly encourage everyone to watch/read a few tutorials before you get started so you have a gameplan going into this project. <— which is pretty safe, general advice for just about any DIY project you tackle. A little research and pre-planning is always a good idea in our playbook. =)

nursery_gallery_wall_minted_frames_wallpaper-27So what do you say, anyone feeling confident enough to try their hand at temporary wallpaper?! Before you get started…. we do want to leave you with a DISCLAIMER.  We haven’t yet lived through a cycle of tempaper, so we are not sure how hard it is to get this off the walls when it comes time.

We hope the wallpaper is just as forgiving as it was when we wanted to reposition it on the wall during installation, but we can’t make any promises. Has anyone had any experience with this?! We’d love hear your expertise and share that insight along with this tutorial.Tips_for_hanging_temporary_WallpaperBridget and Casey Signature

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